Six-axis Robot Turns 3D Printing Into an Art Form

  Enquire / contact me

A project at the Centre for Fine Print Research (CFPR) is looking at 3D printing from a totally different angle

Automation

Six-axis Robot Turns 3D Printing Into an Art Form
Six-axis Robot Turns 3D Printing Into an Art Form

A project at the Centre for Fine Print Research (CFPR) is looking at 3D printing from a totally different angle - where the emphasis is placed on meaningful expression, rather than the accurate reproduction of digital data. A flexible Mitsubishi Electric MELFA RV-7FLM articulated arm industrial robot is at the centre of the project.

Additive Manufacturing (3D printing) is increasingly being used in the manufacturing industry for prototyping, low volume manufacture and for making items with complex shapes which cannot easily be reproduced by other means. The main challenge is posed by complex geometry; when an object is to be fabricated, the shape must be broken down into a series of machine tool paths that will accumulate material by building up layers in a stable and reliable way. For this reason, 3D printing is generally a very precisely controlled process, both in terms of the type of movement (steady acceleration and velocity) and the deposition of materials. In industrial applications, material is deposited or fused in small quantities. The machines are accordingly operated in a logical, numerical way, just as in CNC machining.

Conversely, the Centre for Fine Print Research (CFPR) project is looking at 3D printing from the viewpoint of the Arts, where the emphasis is placed on meaningful expression. A good analogy to the project would be the potter’s wheel, where the artist works in direct contact with clay and with an intimate understanding of the constraints of working the material and the wheel in synergy. Here, the artist is able to express something with the material, often pushing the material to its limits, for example by generating sweeping elegant forms, or revealing new material qualities, such as translucency.
Using a printer in ‘unusual ways’ means moving beyond simply using CAD models and slicing algorithms, as these are too automated. By writing proprietary software, it is possible to develop printing methods from the point of view of how the material can be expressively played with. In order to achieve this shifted perspective, the project is using a Mitsubishi Electric MELFA RV-7FLM robot arm to research technologies and techniques to sense and manipulate materials in a dynamic way, rather than deposit them in fixed, rigid or ‘machine-like’ ways.

Posted on October 13, 2017 - (946 views)
Mitsubishi Electric Corporation, Factory Automation Systems Group
2-3-7 Marunouchi, Chiyoda-Ku
100-8310 Tokyo - Japan
+81-3-32186513
View full company profile
Location
More products from this supplier
Connect Everything with e-Factory
Connect Everything with eFactory
e-F@ctory initiative
Take Your Factory With you
Quality Management and Digitalisation
Smart Condition Monitoring Solution
OPC UA companion specification
Enhanced Machine Handling
How Our Robots See an Apple
Flexible line integration delivered by modular Linear Transfer System
Related articles
Modular Compact CPU Board
Absolute Modular Encoders
Automation Server
Gateway to Integrate Communication
Industrial Grade Bluetooth Beacon
Industrial Micro ATX Motherboard
High-Performance Box PC
Encoders for Robotics and Motors
Double Column Machining for Large Dies
Stop Wasting Time on Network Commissioning Reports
IIoT I/O Series
Mercury: Mobile, multi-protocol diagnostics for all environments
Sure Signs of Excellence: Top Notch Products Offering Added Value
Innovative Systems Solutions Made by LAPP
Alarm-Annunicators, Grouped Indicators, Tri-Led and Phase Presences
Advanced Thermal Imaging Exx-Series
AN INDUSTRY FIRST FOR INDUSTRIAL ETHERNET
A Sure Sign of Excellence: Top-notch Products Offering Added Value
Room for new Perspectives. Simatic PCS 7 V9.0: More Flexibility in Process Automation
Make Your Factory Smarter, and Wiser!