Nanotechnology & Big Data – The Next Industrial Revolution?

  Enquiry / contact me

New report commissioned by the Lloyd’s Register Foundation

Nanotechnology & Big Data – The Next Industrial Revolution?
Nanotechnology & Big Data – The Next Industrial Revolution?

A report commissioned by the Lloyd's Register Foundation, reviewing the potential implications of nanotechnology on the safety and performance of engineering assets and the infrastructure on which modern society relies, finds that nanotechnology will have a far reaching impact on almost every industry including energy, transportation, manufacturing, medical, computing and telecommunications.

An expert panel led by Professor Sir Mark Welland FRS FREng, Director of the Nanoscience Centre at the University of Cambridge was assembled by the Lloyd's Register Foundation in October 2013 to consider nanotechnology. The panel included top academics from world-leading institutions: the universities of Cambridge, Heriot-Watt and Southampton and the Health Safety Laboratory in the UK; Yale in the USA; the National University of Singapore and Münster in Germany.

The resulting report identified five key areas of impact:

  • Miniaturisation of sensor technology: Embedded nano-sensors in structural materials such as concrete, or 'living' inside engines, providing feedback on corrosion or stresses, will give continuous readout of real-time structural and systems performance data. This technology will also enhance robotics and un-manned vehicles across the transport sector (UAVs).
  • Big data: Not so much a development but an implication of ubiquitous sensing is the massive increase in data being collected, with major implications concerning assurance about quality, security and traceability.
  • Engineered smart materials: The development of new engineering materials and manufacturing techniques, using lighter, stronger materials with designer properties could see, for example, ships being glued together from lightweight composites. Parallel developments in 3D printing will also enable printing of metals.
  • Energy storage: Small compact batteries with massive storage capacity combined with the ability to harvest energy from their environment could deliver profoundly different transportation systems or enable white goods to be powered for life at point of purchase.
  • Nanoparticles: The report also highlighted the need for research into methods for assessing the safety, quality assurance and traceability of nanoparticles in the supply chain.

The engineering applications of nanotechnology and big data will herald a new digital future leading to improvements in safety, performance and reliability. A copy of the foresight review of nanotechnology can be downloaded at www.lrfoundation.org.uk/publications/nanotech.aspx

Posted on September 3, 2014 - (99 views)
by
Related articles
Condition and Torque Monitoring System
Energy Storage & Recovery System
New Medical Standards Certifications
Autonomous Electrochemical & Impedance Front End
A Perfectly Imperfect World
Mixers with Lightnin Technology
Direct Composits Combinations
Axetris puts micro-technology to work
Analog Devices Opens its new UK Headquarters Office in London
Yamaha Showed its Ability to Combine Robot Technology and Track Action at its Annual Distributor Meeting
Sensors & Instrumentation Live from 25 to 26 September 2019
Filters and Filter Fans for Outdoor
Ultrasonic Air Flowmeter for Compression Applications
Enhance your Productivity
Partner Program Helps Choose the Right Product
Sensing Technology for Process and Control
Cloud for Pressure Measurement
Constant Force Springs
Float-type Level Switches
Thermocouple Cables
Volumetric and Gravimetric Feeders
Ultrasonic Air Flowmeter for Compression Applications
EUEW 64th General Convention: Upcoming Challenges for European Electrical Wholesalers
EN 388 Has Changed
Industrial Safety Helmet
Advanced Pyrometers with Line Optics
Electricity generators from tidal streams
Smart Temperature Probe
Robot Portfolio
Unmatched Precision in Distance and Thickness Measurements with Confocal Sensors